Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Technologies

Published - Feb 2015| Analyst - Nelly Puren| Code - EGY037D
Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Technologies
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Report Highlights

The yearly and cumulative investment spending by separation technology was$ 6.8 billion in 2014. It is estimated that the spending will be $6.8 billion in 2015 and $1 billion in 2019, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of -32%.

Report Includes

  • An overview of the global market for carbon capture and storage, and related technologies and applications.
  • Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2014, estimates for 2015, and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2019.
  • Information on the status of competing carbon capture technologies as well as global technological research and development (R&D) for carbon capture technologies
  • Analysis of the costs to the purchasers of carbon capture equipment, and also analysis of the impact to the consumer
  • Insight into what technologies are emerging that could compete with existing technologies in use or displace those technologies
  • An in-depth patent analysis
  • Comprehensive profiles of major players in the industry and how these companies are positioning their technology to compete against other technologies.

Report Scope

This report focuses on projects for the deployment of carbon capture, storage and utilization (CCUS) technologies and the short- or long-term sequestration of anthropogenic emissions that would otherwise be emitted from large point sources such as power stations or industrial facilities.

The report will analyze the three major routes which have been developed for capture of CO2 in both power and industrial plants—pre-combustion, oxy-fuel combustion, and post-combustion—as well as the capabilities of inherent separation processes. For each, the report presents the applications, underlying technologies, economic driving forces and major ongoing projects.

The report also includes a review of the current and emerging uses of CO2, including a description of the underlying technologies and their potential.

As CCUS development depends heavily on current climate policies, the report also reviews recent developments in emissions regulation and development support programs that may impact CCUS deployment in a number of countries.

Major market and market segments are measured and forecasted for several years, including 2014, and five-year forecasts are made to 2019 in most cases.

While traditional uses of CO2 are mentioned, the report focuses on emerging uses that could offer opportunities to increase CO2 utilization and therefore its sequestration.

The report does not consider captive uses for CO2 where the CO2 is an intermediate product in the process. Captive uses may be mentioned but are not included in our estimates because these processes do not offer additional demand for captured CO2 in the future. Capture of atmospheric CO2 is also not included in the report.

Analyst Credentials

Ms. Nelly Puren has been working for several years as market analyst for the chemical and energy sectors in a major European bank as well as in an international top tier strategy consultancy company. She supports CEOs, marketing departments, sales business units, strategists and investors with information on energy and chemical markets for making strategic company decisions. Projects include alternative energy technologies, energy efficiency policies in Europe, CHP generation, refining, biofuels, bio-plastics, paper and water chemicals and C4 derivatives.

She has a master’s degree in business and administration from both the University of Rennes (France) and the University of Augsburg (Germany).

Table of Contents & Pricing

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Published - Jan-2011| Analyst - Anna Welch Crull| Code - EGY037C

Report Highlights

Report Includes

  • The status of competing technologies as well as technological research and development for systems designed to mitigate global warming
  • Analyses of global market trends, with data from 2009, estimates for 2010, and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2015
  • Coverage of technologies that are able to capture carbon dioxide from stationary sources at the point of emission; the report, however, does not evaluate technologies that are used to capture other global warming gases such as methane
  • Examination of current and pending U.S., state, and international regulations governing the emission of carbon dioxide
  • Comprehensive company profiles and patent evaluations.

Published - May-2008| Analyst - Alton Parrish| Code - EGY037B

Report Highlights

  • The global market for carbon capture technologies increased from $80.2 billion in 2006 to $88.7 billion in 2007. It should reach $236.3 billion by 2012, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 21.8%.
  • The post-combustion segment has the largest share of the market and is expected to generate about $10 billion per year in spending at a CAGR of 15.7% between 2007 and the end of 2012.
  • Global government and private research spending for carbon capture technologies is expected to remain at approximately $2.1 billion to $2.4 billion per year between 2007 and the end of 2012.

Published - Dec-2004| Analyst - Edward Gobina| Code - EGY037A

Report Highlights

  • Carbon dioxide demand as an industrial gas will increase at an AAGR (average annual growth rate) of 2.4% from $3.2 billion in 2003 to $3.6 billion in 2008.
  • Energy-related CO2 emissions will increase at an AAGR of 2.4%, unchanged from the 2000-2003 period, due to increased use of natural gas for power generation and the adoption of carbon trading mechanisms.
  • Global CO2 concentration will increase at an AAGR corresponding to 1.6% to 859 gigatons.
  • CO2 trading rose from 8 million tons/year in 2000 to 29 million tons in 2003 and will continue to climb at an AAGR of 38.7% through 2008.

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